8/30/2012 Picked Up Books with Seventeen Days to Go


Lorraine picked up 240 books to sell, plus my own free copies. Now I’ve got to sell the 240 at my release/signing party from 2-5 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 16 at the Feasting Fox, a presigning from 6-11 p.m. Sept 15 at the German Cultural Society’s Donau-Park at 5020 West Four Ridge Road in House Springs and a reading at 7 p.m. Sept. 17 at the St. Louis County Library Headquarters. Can I sell them all? Absolutely, but only with your help.

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8/29/2012 Berlin’s Man in St. Louis – 18 Days to Go


If a German dies in St. Louis, Lansing Hecker often is the one called upon to often does paperwork for Germans here. Without that help, they may have to go to the German consul general in Chicago. The fifth-generation German-American often is a ceremonial leader at local German events.

He’ll say a few words during the opening program for the release/signing party for Beer, Brats, and Baseball: St. Louis Germans from 2-5 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 16 at the Feasting Fox Restaurant, 4200 S. Grand. Blvd., St. Louis. That’s just 18 days away.

Hecker is the great-great grandson of Friedrich Hecker, a German freedom fighter who came to America, bought a farm 30 miles east of St. Louis and led a regiment of German-Americans in the Civil War.

The story of Lansing Hecker is on Page 188 of Beer, Brats, and Baseball: St. Louis Germans. The story of his great-great grandfather is on Page 27.

All in the Family

The brewing magnate Adolphus Busch, shown at left, wasn’t the only member of his family to run a brewery in the St. Louis area. Adolphus’ older brother opened one in Belleville, Ill. in 1834. In 1848, George opened a malt house and brewery in St. Louis called both Busch’s Brewery and Buena Vista Brewery.
Another brother, John Baptiste Busch, started a brewery in Washington, Mo. in the 1850s that operated until the start of prohibition.
Adolphus, meanwhile, went into the brewing business with his father-in-law Eberhardt Anheuser in the 1860s. With their product, Budweiser, they soon were dominating brewing in St. Louis and the country.
The story of the multiple Busch brewers is on Page 161 of Beer, Brats, and Baseball: St. Louis Germans. The release/signing party for the book will be from 2-5 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 16 at the Feasting Fox Restaurant, 4200 S. Grand Blvd., St. Louis.

8/28/2012 A dining suggestion with 19 days to go


As the new-book smell wafts from the just-delivered copies of Beer, Brats, and Baseball: St. Louis Germans party-goers may wonder where they should eat on Sunday, Sept. 16, the day of my release/signing party at the Feasting Fox, 4200 S. Grand Blvd. Actually, the Feasting Fox has a succulent Sunday brunch until 2 p.m., when the party starts at the Gretchen Inn, the restaurant’s banquet facility. The restaurant then serves its regular meal until 8 p.m., ensuring those exiting the party when it ends at 5 p.m. don’t have far to go have a good place to eat. In the spirit of the day, try their sauerbraten.

8/27/2012 The Book Arrives – 20 Days to Go


Twenty days before the release/signing party for Beer, Brats, and Baseball: St. Louis Germans, the first copy of the book arrived in the Reedy Press office. It looks marvelous. Soon you’ll be able to buy one through Amazon or at a bookstore. But you know you don’t want to miss out on the fun of attending the release/signing party and buying a copy personally inscribed by me. It’s from 2-5 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 16 at Gretchen’s Inn at Al Smith’s Feasting Fox Restaurant, 4200 S. Grand Blvd., St. Louis. But you know that.

8/23/2012 Here’s what you’ll see

… When you walk into my release/signing party. A big two-foot-by-six-foot welcome sign. It’s not too far away. Put it on your calendar. That’s 2-5 p.m., Sunday, Sept. 16 at the Feasting Fox, 4200 S. Grand. You can buy Beer, Brats, and Baseball: St. Louis Germans on Amazon, but then you’d miss all the fun of my party, not to mention my¬†personal inscription in the book. And the sight of me in lederhosen.

Frontier Justice

By bringing about 750 traditionalist Lutherans from Saxony to Missouri in 1838-39, Martin Stephan struck a blow for religious liberty. Those Lutherans would form the basis for what became The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. But Stephan himself soon was accused of sexual immorality, misusing funds, teaching false doctrine, and ignoring fellow leaders. He was expelled from his community in Perry County, Mo., stripped of most of his possessions, taken across the Mississippi River and abandoned, in a clear example of frontier justice.

You can read Martin Stephan’s story on Page 99 of Beer, Brats, and Baseball: St. Louis Germans by Jim Merkel. The book¬†will be out in September and is available through Amazon.com. The release/signing party will be from 2-5 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 16 at the Feasting Fox, 4200 S. Grand. Blvd. in St. Louis.