On to the Printer!

 

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The view to the west from the top of the Gateway Arch, including the new entrance and the Park Over the Highway

This week, we finally finished the proofreading of my new Gateway Arch book and sent it off to the printers. I’m told copies of The Making of an Icon: The Dreamers, The Schemers, and the Hard Hats Who Built The Gateway Arch, 2nd Edition should be in the new warehouse no later than June 18. That’s more than enough time to have plenty of books on hand for the launch party from 2-5 p.m. Sunday, June 24, at The Royale St. Louis Bar and Grill, Tavern and Restaurant. Come have fun, buy a book and have me autograph it.

The book contains much of what I wrote about in the volume that appeared in 2014 and a lot more. There’s more than 60 new pictures. I offer some fascinating details about how the Arch got its shape. Just what is a weighted catenary curve, and why did Eero Saarinen care?  I’ve come up with some answers you wouldn’t expect. I wrote about the daredevils who rappelled down the Arch to check on the strange stains on the monument and devote space to problems that might come from cleaning it. Of course, I couldn’t leave out details about the $380 million re-do of the Arch grounds and museum.

I think it’s much better than the first book, which I always thought was my best book.  Now that you know, how could you not buy it?

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An Impressive First Look

A new picture of Eero Saariinen for the second edition.

I’m sitting here at my dining room table taking a first look at the first proofs of The Making of an Icon: The Dreamers, The Schemers, and The Hard Hats Who Built The Gateway Arch, 2nd Edition. Yes, I’ve found some boo-boos, but that’s all right. That’s why you look at proofs, so you can catch the mistakes. But what I see so far is that this edition is much better than the one that came out in 2014.

Almost everything is there from the first book. But there are plenty of new details to make this stand out, in chapters about the $380 million makeover of the Arch grounds and museum and how modern “building climbers” rappelled down the Arch to check on dirty spots that showed up in the monument. I wrote about the meaning of the new Gateway Arch National Park designation and offered something on that amazing shape of the Gateway Arch. There’s more to it than just an Arch.  There are dozens of new pictures, plus 16 color pages provided by Getty Images.

It’ll be a book for every lover of the Gateway Arch, which should mean every St. Louisan. That’s why everybody in St. Louis should plan now to attend the book launch party for The Making of an Icon: The Dreamers, The Schemers, and The Hard Hats Who Built The Gateway Arch, 2nd Edition. You can buy one of the first copies available anywhere, get my autograph and have fun at the event from 2-5 p.m. Sunday June 24 at the Royale, 3132 S. Kingshighway Blvd.

Now if you’ll excuse me, I’ve got to get back to my proofreading.

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The cover for the 2nd Edition

 

 

 

We Have a Cover

The cover for the 2nd Edition

In just six weeks on so, The Making of an Icon: The Dreamers, The Schemers, and The Hard Hats Who Built The Gateway Arch, 2nd Edition, will be out. It’s getting exciting, more so that we now have a cover. It’s one of many big differences from the old book that you’ll want to see after it’s released.

Released in 2014, the original book contained well-known, and rare, stories about the visionaries, finaglers, protesters, and fearless-and-skilled hands involved in an incredible undertaking that courted as much controversy as it did enthusiasm.  The St. Louis Post-Dispatch was so impressed with the work that it put it on its list of the 50 best books of 2014.

With dozens of new pictures, the second edition includes that information, plus new details about how Gateway Arch designer Eero Saarinen used math to give the monument its peculiar shape. There are new chapters about the “building climbers” who rappelled down the Arch to take samples of strange stains on its surface, the $380 million “do-over” of the Arch grounds and the name change to the Gateway Arch National Park. It’s bound to become the essential book about the Gateway Arch.